History of Tongue Point Naval Shipyard

The Tongue Point Naval Shipyard was established in 1921 at the mouth of the Columbia River near Astoria, Oregon. The Tongue Point Naval Shipyard was originally founded by the Department of Defense as a U.S. submarine and destroyer base. The Tongue Point Naval site went on to be a seaplane air station during World War II and contributed significantly to the Navy’s war efforts. It was not until 1946 that the Tongue Point Naval Shipyard accommodated ships. Long piers were constructed to berth vessels of the Pacific Reserve Fleet.

In January 1962, the Tongue Point Naval Shipyard was deactivated and converted into a training center for seamanship trade. The Tongue Point Naval Shipyard holds small sea vessels, including training ships and service tug boats. The Tongue Point Naval Shipyard training center is the only one of its kind that offers training on seamanship trade.

Currently, the Tongue Point Naval Shipyard site is operated by the Labor Department of the United States and the Inland Boatman’s Union. As a former Department of Defense site, the Tongue Point Naval Shipyard falls under the Formerly Used Defense Sites (FUDS) program.

Asbestos & the Tongue Point Naval Shipyard

As an older shipyard and ship reconnaissance site, the Tongue Point Naval Shipyard contained many vessels rife with asbestos. Asbestos was used extensively in shipyard operations at the Tongue Point Naval Shipyard prior to the discovery of its health dangers in the 1980s. Asbestos was an ideal insulation material for shipbuilding and repair because of its properties to resist corrosion, high temperatures, and its fireproofing ability. Asbestos was used in various areas of the ships at the Tongue Point Naval Shipyard including:

  • Boilers
  • Turbines
  • Electrical and plumbing insulation
  • Pumps
  • Steam pipe
  • Incinerators
  • Gaskets
  • Valves
  • Welding blankets
  • Building insulation

When asbestos materials are manipulated, a fibrous asbestos dust can be released into the air. When this dust is inhaled or ingested, it lodges in the body and can cause serious diseases. Tongue Point Naval shipyard workers were unaware of asbestos dangers and worked with asbestos without wearing protective equipment. Shipyard workers, including those who were employed at the Tongue Point Naval Shipyard, have developed Mesothelioma, asbestosis, and lung cancer.

Asbestos Injuries at the Tongue Point Naval Shipyard – Oregon

If you or a loved were exposed to asbestos at the Tongue Point Naval Shipyard and have been diagnosed with an asbestos-related disease, contact us today to determine if you have a case and are entitled to compensation.

Published November 17, 2011 by