On June 19, 2009, the FDA issued a warning to consumers not to eat any prepackaged Nestle Toll House refrigerated cookie dough raw because of a risk of contamination with E. coli 0157:H7, a bacterium that causes foodborne illness.  Nestle USA’s Baking Division, which manufactures and markets the cookie dough, immediately initiated a Nestle Toll House refrigerated cookie dough recall.  The cookie dough recall was issued as a result of an ongoing investigation by the FDA and the CDC.  The CDC, along with several state and local health departments, has discovered in an ongoing epidemiological study 69 reports of E. coli illness across 29 states since March 2009 related to cookie dough.  Thirty-four people required hospitalization, while nine developed Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (HUS), a type of kidney failure, which helped precipitate the cookie dough recall.

Nestle Toll House Cookie Dough Recalled

The list of Nestle Toll House Cookie Dough recalled products currently includes all varieties of the following:

  • Nestle Toll House Refrigerated Cookie Bar Dough
  • Nestle Toll House Refrigerated Cookie Dough Tub
  • Nestle Toll House Refrigerated Cookie Dough Tube
  • Nestle Toll House Refrigerated Limited Edition Cookie Dough items
  • Nestle Toll House Refrigerated Seasonal Cookie Dough
  • Nestle Toll House Refrigerated Ultimates Cookie Bar Dough

Preliminary results suggested a strong enough correlation with eating raw prepackaged cookie dough and the illnesses reported that Nestle agreed to the voluntary cookie dough recall.  Additionally, while the bacteria would be killed by cooking the product, the FDA recommended that consumers simply throw the cookie dough away as consumers might get the bacteria on their hands or on other surfaces if attempting to cook.

Cookie Dough Recalled Products Contains E. Coli 0157:H7

Shortly after the cookie dough recall was initiated, on June 29, 2009, the FDA announced its discovery of E. coli 0157:H7 in a sample of prepackaged Nestle Toll House refrigerated cookie dough that was collected from a Nestle facility in Danville, Va. on June 25, 2009. A number of patients reporting E. coli illnesses also reported having eaten raw prepackaged Nestle Toll House cookie dough before the cookie dough recall was initiated.  E. coli, which is at issue in the cookie dough recalls, causes abdominal cramping, vomiting and bloody diarrhea.  While most healthy adults can recover within a week, young children and the elderly are at risk of developing HUS, which can lead to serious kidney damage or even death.  If you or a loved one is experiencing any E. coli symptoms and has recently eaten raw prepackaged cookie dough, contact a doctor immediately because you may have eaten recalled cookie dough contaminated with E. coli.

Cookie Dough Recall Lawsuits

For more information about the recent Nestle Toll House cookie dough recall and to learn about how to bring a cookie dough E. coli lawsuit, contact us today.

Published November 17, 2011 by