Cialis, which has the active ingredient Tadalafil, is an orally administereddrug used to treat male erectile dysfunction (ED), or impotence. Cialis was initially developed by the biotechnology firm ICOS, but was subsequently produced and marketed worldwide by a joint venture between ICOS Corp. and Eli Lilly and Company (Lilly ICOS LLC).

Cialis tablets are yellow, film-coated, and almond-shaped. The pills come in 5, 10, or 20 mg doses, and are only available with a prescription. In addition to treating ED, Cialis is currently undergoing Phase 3 clinical trials for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension.

In the United States, Cialis obtained FDA approval and became available in December, 2003 as the third impotence pill after Viagra (sildenafil) and Levitra (vardenafil). Due to its 36-hour effect, Cialis is nicknamed “the weekend pill.” As with Viagra and Levitra, it is recommended that Cialis be used no more than once daily.

How Cialis Works

Cialis works by blocking PDE5, a chemical in the body that reverses an erection. When this chemical is blocked, the arteries in the penis are able to open wider so that more blood can flow into the penis. Cialis can start working in as little as 30 minutes, and can work up to 36 hours from the time a dose is taken. Because Cialis has no effect on the chemicals that cause an erection (it simply keeps them in the penis longer), it does not work without sexual stimulation.

Who Should Not Take Cialis

Cialis should never be taken without a prescription. Although it is commonly bought on the street and on the internet, Cialis can be dangerous if taken with certain other medications or if a patient has certain pre-existing health conditions. Particularly, Cialis can be extremely dangerous if taken by people using nitrate drugs, often prescribed for chest pains (angina).

In recent years, Cialis has been linked to serious side effects such as blindness and hearing loss. If you or a family member took Cialis and suffered a serious side effect, you may be entitled to compensation for you injuries. Contact our experienced lawyers today to learn more.

Published November 17, 2011 by